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changes in the uk media landscape. it didn't take long for staff from the "news of the world" to end up in the local pub in britain, losing your job normally ends in drinking a pint, and these journalists had a lot to reflect on. the 168-year-old tabloid is a british institution. the phone hacking scandal left it in a political vortex, from which it couldn't escape. its owner, rupert murdoch, realized his entire empire was at risk of being tainted. one can only imagine the conversation he had with his son james, who runs the uk business. >> i feel regret. clearly the practices of certain individuals did not live up to the standards and quality of journalism that we believe in and that i believe in. >> reporter: it was the revelation that a murdered school girl had been targeted by journalists from the paper who eavesdropped on her cell phone messages that was the beginning of the end for the paper. hacking into cell phone messages is illegal in the uk. the scandal that the "news of the world" had been systematical systematically eavesdropping on people for years had been swirling around
an ever widening crisis here in the uk, suspension that the company targeting americans is gaining momentum. the fbi has opened an investigation into an unsourced report in one british tabloid that "news of the world "account attempted to hack the phones of 9/11 victims. news international, the subsidiary in the uk, tells nbc news they have seen no evidence to support the claim. but with brooks gone and a full-blown investigation on going in the uk that involves a former prime minister and the royals, among others, some experts believe investigators in the u.s. will hold off for now. >> the u.s. is not going to want to be seen as trying to trump the british. the britts are going to be the ones who investigate this. it's really their interest at stake. >> reporter: james murdoch wrote a letter to staff as well outlining what news international has done so far to try to fix this problem. he mentioned the resignation of rebecca brooks, the backing out of the deal as well as the closing of the "news of the world" newspaper. he went on to say that news international is going to print th
out tomorrow. >> indeed. we'll have to see what difference this makes. now, in the u.k., an enormous story, really, that is shaking the government in some ways. certainly putting the prime minister under pressure in parliament. police are theying there will be a full investigation into new hacking allegations, into "the news of the world." it's a sunday newspaper. advertisers are turning their backs on the u.k.'s most popular sunday read. the tabloid stands accused of hacking into the phones of a missing schoolgirl that was later found dead. as well as relatives of the 2005 london bombings six years ago. and the families of soldiers killed in iraq and afghanistan. revelations have made waves across the u.k. and even led to a debate in parliament. and definitely in that debate, i think it's fair to say that the prime minister at times looked very much to be on the back foot. >> he seemed to be. very close with the former editor of "the news of the world." shareholders also getting out of the paper's parent company, which is newscorp. its stock price fell 5% on wednesday. did pull back
the head rupert merdock. critics say he should be here in the u.k. answering questions about the conduct of his journalists. matt, "bbc world news." >> let's speak to our political correspondent joining us now from westminster. >> this all started about celebrities' voice mails being hacked into. but over the past few days this has really developed. >> yes. and just when you think this has gotten as bad as it could get, the latest claims that the families of dead soldiers were hacked is particularly disturbing and raises more and more difficult questions for the police in britain. because originally the police said they looked into the allegations and said it was just a few isolated incidents and that there wasn't any need to investigate further and that now poses the question that either there was some kind of coverup at scotland yard or they just didn't think those allegations were serious enough to warrant investigation. and as we've now seen such as the phone a murdered school girl having had her phone hacked, this has really blown up. >> it's difficult for police, but how difficult
of rupert murdoch news corporation reaches far beyond the u.k. his company was born in australia in 1952 as news limited which today is about 70% of australian numerous. we're joined by a professor at the university of sydney. he joins me now. thank you for joining us. what did you make of the hearings? >> it was like late-night football here. i thought the statement i know nothing was interesting. murdoch in australia has for a long time had a reputation of having an intimate knowledge of what's run in his newspapers. locals rightly or wrongly basically believed that from across the other side of the world he has a pretty good idea of what he's doing. he's a senior executive, runs a very large organization and he had no idea about the criminal activity that was going on. interesting. >> it is an interesting point you raise. many people that have worked for him said 20 or 30 years ago he was very much hands on. this perhaps an indication of how he's let things maybe slip or even on account of his age. would you agree with that? >> yeah, it could be that. in which case you'll ask have to
escalates, rupert murdoch and his son james prepared to face questions from a u.k. parliamentary committee. gaddafi must go. u.s. officials deliver an uncompromising message to their libyan counterparts in a secret meeting. the eurozone debt crisis worsens. fears for the major banks cause a stock market slump. u.s. secretary of state hillary clinton builds bridges on a two- day trip to india. it is 11:00 a.m. in singapore. >> it is 4:00 a.m. in london, broadcasting in america and around the world. this is "newsday." the owner of britain's biggest media empire, rupert murdoch, is to make his first appearance before a committee of british members of parliament on tuesday to face questioning about the phone hacking scandal at the "news of the world." his son james will also give evidence, and will the former boss, rebekah brooks. the scandal has already forced two a senior police officers to resign. >> he is ben yates of the are no longer, resigning just a day after his boss, sir paul stevenson. both paying the price for failing to get to grips with the hacking scandal. so said the mayor of l
of the uk labs. >> they are not finding medical benefit, societal benefit, from a lot of this research. what this report actually does is provide chilling insight into research in the u.k. and it is time for a call for this to end. >> this is newsday on the bbc. i am in singapore. >> i am in london libya has condemned britain's decision to expel all of colonel khadafy's lipitor -- diplomats after recognizing the transitional council as the libyan government. >> norway has launched an independent inquiry into friday said the attacks. >> let's get more on that story now. thomas edgar was one of the first journalist on the scene after last friday's mass killing on the island. he says police reacted relatively quickly, despite criticism of their response time. >> there seems to be a lot of tension, especially among the journalists. in my opinion, they had two options. one was to wait for the helicopters being scrambled from one of the army bases, which was outside of oslo, then to get a pickup point, load their gear, flight to the island, etc. or they could go directly to the island, which is ap
empire is taking a hit. today the woman who ran his uk newspaper business quit and the man who ran "the wall street journal" for murdock quit after 57 years with him. we'll talk business impact tonight with david faber of cnbc in just a moment. the breaking news out of london tonight, nbc's stephanie gosk starts us off tonight. stephanie, good evening. >> reporter: good evening brian. well, les henson was the head of news international in the uk from 1995 through 2007. the current head of news international also resigned today, rebecca brooks. she worked under henton when illegal phone hacking took place. the most damaging accusations over the years, the one that triggered this crisis led rupert murdock to an unlikely meeting here. rupert murdock met with millie dowler's family, the young girl whose phone was hacked by reporters. when the meeting ended, murdock was greeted outside by cat calls. he was ushered inside but wouldn't stay there long. >> as founder of the company i was appalled and i will find out when it happened. and i apologize. >> reporter: earlier in the tied today, the
in the u.k. with our a budget is we are securing schooling and we'll be able to do it at 2.5% of the cost. this is a good investment for britain, for british taxpayers to make sure we reduce inequality in our world. >> can the prime minister explain whether he thinks that the cost of his nhs reforms set to rise even further we now know with the revelation that a new super quango is going to be created. it might be partly responsible putting at risk services at the popular school in my constituency? >> what we've actually seen since this government has taken office is more than 2,000 more doctors but 4,000 fewer managers. and we are cutting bureaucracy by a third. i know they don't like to hear it. but if we'd followed their plans and cut nhs spending, you'd see the number of doctors, the number of nurses, the number of operations going down. and just this morning, we see the figures for the number of diagnostic tests in the u.k. going up. that's because of the investment going in under this government. >> thank you, mr. speaker. will the prime minister be aware of the news this morning th
of my life. >> they are reporting on rottenness. the media directing a lens at the u.k.'s biggest u.k. newspaper company. there has never been anything quite like this. what did the murdoch's know about the alleged abuse? not as you mutt -- not as much as you might think. >> i need to say something. this is not an excuse, maybe an explanation. "the news of the world," is less than 1% of our company. we employ many people around the world who are ethical and distinguished. they are professionals. i am watching and appointing people to my trust. >> the revelation only 15 days ago of the alleged acting, the instigation of the "news of the world," and the murdoch family having to explain themselves. >> when did you find out that the criminality was endemic? >> in >> is a very wide ranging word. -- endemic is a very wide- ranging word. i have to be careful not to interfere with the search for justice taking place right now. i was absolutely shocked, appalled, and ashamed when i heard about the case. >> was there a coverup given that most of the alleged phone hacking and illegal bribing hap
been reinvested in the u.s., nothing sent back to the uk. here is my experience with emigrations -- immigration's. 2002, they issued a visa. 2003, successfully renewed in the u.s. be given eight months to prove our viability. thanks to my attorney for her experience and patience. 2005, the says are renewed successfully. but we have to return to the u.k. for processing because the laws changed. basically, when i try to renew again, they did not believe that i was a manager. also, they refused to recognize our employee as a professional, even though a four-year degree would exactly mirror the situation. we have been in limbo for 15 months until last friday when we found out the appeal was dismissed on grounds similar to the original denial. at least we know now. or something as important as a green card process, there should be the opportunity to appear before an official to make your case. during the green card fiasco, we were unable to leave the country for family bereavement. we were landlocked. we could not get a renewal of women for five months which must be done outside the u
, of phone hacking that has taken place in the u.k.? >> i am absolutely surprised. i think it would be stunning by any measure. it is especially stunning as you talk about some of the issues -- going into the phone records of family members of servicemen. in the the united states -- in the united states, this would be a huge scandal. >> how does our level of journalism compared to the united states? >> our constitution has as its fourth amendment the right to privacy. every schoolchild knows this. something like this in the united states would be considered an incredible breach. by the same token, i think it's important to understand that many of the tabloid practices seen in britain in the print press have begun to appear in the united states in our broadcast and cable media. we are hardly perfect on this side of the pond. >> what do you think is drawing that? also the 24/7 news cycle, the desire to have something new and something more. that pushes a lot of journalism outlets into minutia. they go after more detail and more information. you saw that in the united states in the cas
as art -- disguised as art, weighing up to 10 kilos each. >> a new drama in the hacking scandal and the u.k. >> news corp. has withdrawn its controversial bid for a full takeover of the state -- b sky b. a warning, this report from our business editor contains some flash photography. >> rupert murdoch, the great news murder -- news mobile, in the news for what he would see as the wrong reasons. putting on one of the great humiliations' of his career, the abandonment of his attempt to buy all british broadcasting. in his statement he said, "we believe the proposed acquisition would benefit both companies, but it has become clear that it is too difficult to progress in this climate." that adverse climate, protest outside parliament and inside, about the b sky b deal. and after the deal is off? >> i think this is the right decision. this company clearly needs to sort out the problems at news international and at news of the world. it is also the right decision for the country, too. >> it is the second setback for mr. murdoch. just days ago he closed the news of the world because of the allegat
's signature will appear on an apology and every u.k. newspaper. he says "news of the world" failed when it came to itself. rebecca barcs may have left the bridge, but her role in this -- rebecca brooks may have left the bridge, but her role in this story will make sure she remains in the headlines. >> the fallout from the scandal continues on both sides of the atlantic. it has been announced that the chief executive of the moroccan down jones has also stepped down. >> when it came to his right hand man, they worked together for 50 years. the reason that led to him in this whole saga is that he was the chairman of news international. he appeared before parliament on two different occasions and he did say both times that this was confined to one reporter, although, it has been littered been alleged that people knew that the hacking went beyond just one reporter. however, mr. hinton, in his resignation, insists that if -- ifs had wrongdoing tha others knew that wrongdoing went further, i was not aware. there will appear to be a clearing of the decks before the at parliamentar next week. th
scale of the uk phone hacking scandal is revealed by a new evidence that suggest queen elizabeth and other members of the royal family have also been hit. the news of the world is accused of paying protection officers for information. in other developments, it is alleged that sunday's times newspaper tried to obtain details about former british prime minister gordon brown finances and tried to access medical information about one of his children. this report from our business editor. >> the head of state, the royal family and their family is the duty of police in the royal protection branch. this morning, i learned that news of the world email uncovered long ago a -- as long ago as 2007 contained evidence that the sunday newspaper was paying royal protection officers for private information about the royal family. it later emerged in the guardian that the bones of prince charles -- the phones of prince charles might have been hacked. the papers disgraced former editor was requesting money to buy a confidential directory called the green book of the royal family's land line teleph
of india to the clubs of the u.k., the illicit trade in the drug -- we have a special report. fighters in misrata say they have made further advances against forces loyal to the libyan leader, colonel muammar gaddafi. >> we are a few kilometers behind the front line here. periodically we can hear the sound of rockets falling in the distance. the rebels said they started pushing back colonel gaddafi's forces from this position which they have held for the past two months. i have been talking to the man in charge of coordinating the rebels operations with nato. i asked what happens during the morning offense. >> the gaddafi forces are running so quickly and they have left their weapons and their ammunition. >> we have heard some complaints about a lack of action from nato from your side. how have they been acting over the past 24 hours? >> we need their support it. we are coordinating and we have planned a very well our offensive this time. >> thank you very much. >> we can hear those airplanes overhead which must be nato jets because of the no-fly zone. it is pretty much trench warfare
a parliamentary system like canada orhe u.k. can produce a rather immediate thumbs up or thumbs down on fiscal direction but in the u.s. and divided congress and perpetual election mode have lead to inaction. i'm not seeing just do something becausethe ght policiesre important as john has indicated but we have to become d -- we have become a kick the can nation or ai think the younger generaon would say we've become a fake ill you make it nation and that's gointo affect economic grth negatively for future ars. >> is this more the presidens fault or republican congress fault? >> well, i think it's both. i mean there's an intract ability here in terms of philosophy. we basically have a canes versus a-- type of moment in which e democrats are suggesting capital injection and stimulus and-- stimulus and the republicans are suggesting capital destruction and a return to balanced budgets. it's a situation, philosophical moment that really defies resolution in terms of coming together on a middle ground and that i think is t problem. the election in 2012 will probably dece it one wa or the other. >>
that more could be received. that they could then potentially report on in the press. the revolt in the uk is at full tilt and the big news overnight, the big news tonight is now the government is going to side with the opposition to actually hurt murdoch where it really hurts in his business interests. a session at parliament tomorrow to attempt to suggest he should withdraw for the bid of the 61% he doesn't own. in britain's may pay tv. that's the breaking news we have at the moment. >> michael, is this stalingrad for murdoch? like the beginning of the moment, that moment where something happens and you stop growing. you're thrown back on your imperial purposes and you never quite expand again? in fact, you begin to contract? is this that important? what's going on here? >> chris, that's well said. yes, this is implosion at the highest level. i frankly and i think -- i think this is certainly the growing analysis in the uk is that there's no way that this company and the murdoch family can continue to run their business in the united kingdom. that they have in a very short period of time
be an impact on morale, and there is -- both by the u.k. and the u.s., and it is potentially billions of gaddafi assets in the united states that can have a practical effect. you have to remember that the transitional national council is a pretty road peabody to be honest with you. -- ropey body, to be honest with you. it brings together all different types of people with different ideologies, and there is a great risk, i would have thought, if they begin to show our money on them, some of that money may go in directions we did not anticipate, and it could disappear into swiss bank accounts. >> do you think then that this is a sign of overconfidence on the part of the international community, that they are recognizing this court so quickly? >> i know they hesitated for some time to do this, precisely for the reasons i just set out, but they have had, on the other hand, four months of bombing, as caroline pointed out, which has failed to dislodge, abu dhabi or to make any significant changes in the frontline -- which has failed to dislodge colonel gaddafi or to make any signal that in
their celebrity to the u.k.'s big announcement of a u.k. version of silicon valley. and they're presenting this to a bunch of ceos and high-powered executives that are gathered here at the summit. really that's the point of the entire three-day visit is to promote british interest and relations. the royal newlyweds' first official trip to the united states begins today. and it has host city los angeles in the throes of royal fever. >> i haven't really heard of royalty coming to america, especially to l.a. i think it's really cool that they're coming here. exciting. >> definitely. i mean, you can't walk down hollywood or go to certain places and say, oh, hey, there's william and kate. i mean, it's a special occasion. >> reporter: their first stop is the beverly hilton in beverly hills, home to one of hollywood's most glamorous events, the golden globe awards. they'll attend a venture capital and new media summit to promote british trade and investment. ♪ >> reporter: promoting british interests and international relations is what they've been doing for the past nine days in canada. the pr
makes a heart felt statement during the u.k. phone hacking scandal. his appearance with his son james was big news there and big news here. how else did the media react and what else have we learned about the scandal. >> republicans have laid out a responsible and detailed path forward, and the house has passed it. >> jon: the house passes a plan to fix the debt crisis, but the media condemn the effort. >> do we really have time for a plan that is really just show? >> and the great debt debate goes on with more distortion from the liberal press? >> there he's saying brinksmanship, trickery around the time of a deadline just to get your way is sort of economic terrorism. >> has the negative media coverage hurt the effort. >> g.o.p. presidential candidate michele bachmann goes on the defensive after a negative story about her health and ability. did that story fail the journalistic ethics test? >> having fired the imagination of a generation, a ship like no other, its place in history secured, the space shuttle pulls into port for the last time. >> and an end to an era, with no clear fu
senators involved and said i think i have been looking at theur u.k. and wondering if the same thing happen. >> 9/11 victims for most people, that implies a citizen of the united states even though there were many international victims of that horrible tragedy and that is why it is important for us in our oversight capacity to get to the bottom of this. >> the uk has announced an inquiry. prime ministers in australia my review media laws as a result of this scandal. do you want this to be -- to lead to greater regulation of the media or are you trying to weed out any potential wrongdoing at news corp.? >> any regulation of the media is subject to some -- strong first amendment protection. i was a journalism student in the aftermath of watergate. we learned journalism was about accuracy, integrity, and reliability. that is what we have seen a complete change of over the last 25 years and if you look at some of these allegations against news corp., you see that blurring of the line between news gathering, opinion, political propaganda, and now invasion of privacy on behalf of individuals in t
for the owner because they are trying to buy one of the most important media companies in the u.k., british sky. his newspaper corp. owns 39%. the reason he would like 100% because this is a growing business generating huge amounts of cash. this year's profits are expected to close to 1 billion pounds whereas revenues of his famous newspapers are under pressure. for the past year, mr. murdoch has been arguing that the takeover should be allowed to go through without a lengthy investigation by the competition commission. this afternoon, in a germanic -- -- this afternoon, he withdrew to the undertaking. said that the delay in the takeover is better for him than the alternative of abandon it altogether. >> as a result of news corp's actions, i will refer this to the competition commission. i will be writing to them. >> before rupert murdoch, the week has been an eternity in business. the long delay is perhaps the best he can hope for. >> on top of the mounting troubles, as we have mentioned, the bbc has learned that two other news international paper's allegedly targeted the former prime minister
, the latest independent forecasts have the uk growing by just 1.3% in the whole of 2011, which is significantly below the official forecast of 1.7%. to explain the poor growth in the u.k. -- economic factors include the effects on the supply chain caused by the tsunami in japan and the effects of higher global oil prices. other reasons suggested could have been growth, but the royal wedding holiday, the royal wedding itself, too much snow, too much sun in april, and even england's poor showing in world cup. manufacturing dropped by 0.3%. >> that is disappointing because some months back, the manufacturing sector was the bright spot in the u.k.'s economic recovery. that does not bode well going forward. the problem is now that it will be very difficult for the economy to recover any lost ground in the second half of the year. growth in the end might come closer to 1%, which would be very disappointing. >> the british oil giant, bp, reported second quarter profit of $5.3 billion, which is an improvement compared to the record losses this time last year due to the oil spill in the
the eurozone. hello. it is 7:00 a.m. in washington, 3:30 in kabul, and midday in the uk, where the former british prime minister, gordon brown, has been speaking about his shot over allegations that two newspapers used underhand means to obtain financial and medical records relating to his family. mr. brown, whose youngest son, fraser, was diagnosed with cystic fibrosis, spoke exclusively about the allegations that he was targeted. >> i have never, never talked about my son or wanted to talk about my two sons and my late daughter in public. i have always been reluctant. i have never thought it was right that the private lives of young children growing up, who i want to have an ordinary life, should be paraded across the media. i have always sought to keep them from that, and the record will show that is exactly what i did, despite people wanting to have all sorts of stories about their private life and the family's private life. i have never talked about my son's medical condition before, never talked publicly about his medical condition. >> but we are at a point where it is very relevant
'm in singapore. >> i'm in london. >> the headlines this hour. u.k.'s phone hacking crisis has escalated. the top policeman has resigned and the man who was first to allege widespread phone hacking at the "news of the world" has been found dead. >> u.s. officials have met representatives from the libyan government at a secret location to demand colonel gaddafi steps down. >> let's get more on the phone hacking story. over in the u.s., the prominent democrat senator dick durbin is calling for both an f.b.i. and a congressional investigation into whether any whether u.s. laws have been broken by rupert murdoch's media empire. allegations against the corporation race questions about whether it violated the foreign acts. we are joined from new york. thank you for joining us. looking at where the legalities lie in the u.s., tell us where the jurisdiction lies in the u.s. for this. >> the u.s. has a statute called the foreign corrupt practices act that makes it illegal for u.s. companies, but also others, to bribe foreign officials in order to get busine3ey the statute has a broad reach and it has been
that the president -- that the united states will be wary of him in syria. >> the scale of the uk phone hacking scandal is enhanced by new evidence that shows that security for queen elizabeth and other members of the royal family has been put risk. if the bbc has learned that according to company e-mails, the news of the work was paying of royal protection officer for information. there was a director of royal contacts, including royal household staff. four other developments, they tried to obtain details of the former prime minister gordon brown's finances, and that the newspaper tried to access medical information about one of his children culminated an act rupert murdoch's bid for b sky b being referred to ofcom. >> the security of the royal family is the duty of the royal protection branch. the integrity of those officers must be beyond doubt. this morning i learned that news of the world e-mails uncovered by news international in 2007 contains evidence that the sunday newspaper was paying reuter protection officers for private information about the royal family. it later emerged in the gu
in the u.k. -- of mass protests in the u.k. over pensions and pay. >> hundreds of thousands of public workers here in the u.k. were on strike for proposed cuts to their pensions. the unions say half a million people stopped work. schools, gration and other government -- immigration and other government agencies were affected. >> strike day. the one in a saves their pensions or the first in a bitter battle with the government. -- the one that saves their pensions or the first in a bitter battle with the government. for most, it was about their own retirement. they say they shouldn't pay more to pay for bankers' mistakes. ministers say their pensions are simply unaffordable. here they come. public sector workers on the march. the question, though, is whether they have the public with them or whoever is living in downing street does. it was school where the man impact was felt. -- the main impact was felt. many teachers did not go in. this is just one of around 12,000 schools which were either fully pour partially closed -- fully or partially closed. one parent did play teacher for the d
world news." >> more misery for murdoch, two of his senior executives are forced toic quit after the u.k. fonal hacking scandal. opposition activists in syria say dozens of protestors have been killed in demonstrations. >> hugo chavez will return to cuba within the next 24 hours to undergo further treatment for cancer. >> welcome to "bbc news" broadcasting to america and also around the world. >> a desperate plea despite millions being raised for african droughts. charities say more is needed. >> hello and welcome. the media tycoon rupert murdoch has made a personal apology to the family of a murdered british schoolgirl who's phone was hacked by one of his newspapers. the course of the day two of mr. murdoch's senior executives during the phone hacking period resigned. >> it was the day when a chief executive walked away from the company she served for half her life, the day when her employer and friend walked into a london hotel to say sorry to the family they fear they are victims of his paper's wrongdoing. rebecca brooks is the most high profile casualty in the scandal that has spread
in the come out with an austerity plan. people hate the plan. why do we have a better system in the uk? because there's the british they've been before in come through really big is that greece and on its that caused psychological shock politicians but >> rose: bill, what dow make eight out >> and there are small banks spain. what it is the within your. euro-land has less debt than the united the balance versus the comparing it to a row boat with too many people on one side. rebalancing,ffort from a the ecb or fiscal policy kwn as the get funds to the polal problems have been the day. >> the problems in euroland have the u.s. in but we have a really here for some on the debt s. coupled worsening of crisis in the weeks which shock financial when you have both at same te. the difference is, that it is a self-inducedess. >> the president tried to in his press >> absolutely. however say fundamental crisis that debt level countries are insolvent and the single basically the clue as to out of it. >> they have. np clarity on how they wil solve thk it is integrity of will start question. >> gi
news corp., as we know. a good example, the leader of the opposition in the u.k. suggested that they exit the business and that all of them be broken up. doing this under the guise of media plurality. the biggest irony is the interest they have in the uk. people are putting things out there without really thinking through what it can mean for the industry. the entire press could implode on the back of what is going on. >> let's pick up on another ongoing saga. the euro zone. officials in the region are racing to put together a new strategy and greece. still to be resolved? the same question, what role do private investors play in the greek bailout? the german chancellor is pressing them to commit to purchase more bonds, declaring the bigger contribution is made, the less likely further steps will be needed. pushing so hard, the rage incident -- agency ratings ruling has taken place. it has been warned that this monday, if that happens the banks will stop accepting greek bonds as collateral. >> the have agreed for greece and the spotlight be held until september. investors w
to testify in front of the u.k. parliament this week. >> the apology was written and signed by rupert murdoch himself. "we are sorry," it said. murdoch does not usually do apologies, but not everyone is convinced. >> although he has convinced his -- he has expressed his regret, i think it may be false. >> true or false, it is controlled. rebecca brooks the head of his newspaper business and hinton, his right hand man in the u.s., worked in london at the time of the phone hacking. on sunday, rupert murdoch and his son james will be called into a very public hearing in front of the british parliamentary. >> what they ought to be concerned about is whether the american public gets engaged. if that happens then you will start writing obituaries. -- writing news corp. obituaries. >> this is not about the uk news scandal and more. this strikes at the heart of the media empire. >> the independent committee which oversees the editorial integrity of the wall street journal, which is also owned by murdoch, says it sees no evidence of wrongdoing at the journal or at its parent company dow jones. >>> he
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 1,264 (some duplicates have been removed)